bestqualitybeksinski:


Zdzisław Beksiński

bestqualitybeksinski:

Zdzisław Beksiński

Will you sleep for seven thousand years - until the world is different? What if it is exactly the same when, finally, you choose to wake up?

grassbaby:

Radiograph of the hands shows arachnodactyly resulting from Marfan syndrome.

grassbaby:

Radiograph of the hands shows arachnodactyly resulting from Marfan syndrome.

It’s neat how human beings have learned enough about ourselves to the point that - by and large - if something goes wrong we can just open up our guts and fix it. Pretty neat. Good job.

failmacaw:

THE NINE CHOIRS OF HEAVEN.  An info-graphic for my editorial class and god am I thankful it’s done.  Way too much went into this than what I had time for, but hey… I actually kind of like it?

Now excuse me, I must return to my fashion major lifestyle and go sew a coat u_u

EDIT:  Re-uploaded with easier viewing! 

Early CGI Facial Animation (1974)

Surprisingly early — and slightly creepy — parametric facial animation created at the University of Utah in 1974(!)

I made a thing.

nyctopterus:

It’s here! Many of you contributed artwork to the All Yesterdays competition, and the results were so good, Memo Kosemen decided to make a PDF book. It’s free to download on the Irregular Books website.

nyctopterus:

It’s here! Many of you contributed artwork to the All Yesterdays competition, and the results were so good, Memo Kosemen decided to make a PDF book. It’s free to download on the Irregular Books website.

algopop:

“Google no longer understands how its “deep learning” decision-making computer systems have made themselves so good at recognizing things in photos.
What stunned [Google Software Engineer] Quoc V. Le is that the software has learned to pick out features in things like paper shredders that people can’t easily spot – you’ve seen one shredder, you’ve seen them all, practically. But not so for Google’s monster.
Many of Quoc’s pals had trouble identifying paper shredders when he showed them pictures of the machines, he said. The computer system has a greater success rate, and he isn’t quite sure how he could write a program to do this.
Google researchers can no longer explain exactly how the system has learned to spot certain objects, because the programming appears to think independently from its creators, and its complex cognitive processes are inscrutable. " 
Via The Register

algopop:

Google no longer understands how its “deep learning” decision-making computer systems have made themselves so good at recognizing things in photos.

What stunned [Google Software Engineer] Quoc V. Le is that the software has learned to pick out features in things like paper shredders that people can’t easily spot – you’ve seen one shredder, you’ve seen them all, practically. But not so for Google’s monster.

Many of Quoc’s pals had trouble identifying paper shredders when he showed them pictures of the machines, he said. The computer system has a greater success rate, and he isn’t quite sure how he could write a program to do this.

Google researchers can no longer explain exactly how the system has learned to spot certain objects, because the programming appears to think independently from its creators, and its complex cognitive processes are inscrutable. "

Via The Register

Tiny radioactive button. Hopefully it won’t kill me.

Tiny radioactive button. Hopefully it won’t kill me.